Recipe: Whole-Wheat Oven Pancake

If you don’t have anything special planned for Father’s Day (this Sunday!) then here is your answer. This simple whole-wheat German “oven pancake” can easily be passed off as a breakfast, snack, or even a dessert dish (especially if you top it with homemade ice cream…yum). Both the apple and pear suggested below go really well with the flavors, but don’t be afraid to experiment with other fruits like bananas, raisins, or blueberries depending on what you have on hand.Whole-Wheat Oven Pancake from 100 Days of Real Food

Some other Father’s Day brunch ideas are as follows:

Continue Reading »

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Food Babe Investigates: Is Subway Real Food?

This is a guest post from Vani Hari (a.k.a. The Food Babe).


Subway is the single largest chain restaurant in the world. That means you’ve probably eaten there at some point in your lifetime and if you are like me could possibly have 10 of these restaurants within a 1 mile radius of your house.

But is eating at America’s favorite fast food chain really eating real food?

Subway would certainly like you to think so. With their slogan “Eat Fresh,” marketing with avocados and a guy who lost hundreds of pounds eating their famous sub sandwiches, it’s easy to get duped.

You may also feel tricked when you see a little heart logo, indicating a menu item at Subway is “heart healthy.” Just last week it was announced that the American Heart Association (AHA) has endorsed several menu items at Subway and added the heart logo to indicate which ones.

At every Subway on the “sneeze guard” glass they display one version of their nutritional information – the infamous “6 grams of fat or less” menu. This menu includes calories, fat grams, and that new little heart logo, but doesn’t display anything about the ingredients. Doubting that Subway or the AHA would actually ever create a real food information guide for you, I decided it was time to do this myself. Below are the “6 grams or less” menu items and critical real food information you should know about each choice. Continue Reading »

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Milk 101: Whole, Raw, Organic, Low-Fat, Etc.

We’ve been getting all sorts of questions about dairy lately, especially around the many different types of milk options out there. So hopefully this post will clear some things up. Later this month we’ll be sharing our thoughts on cheese, sour cream, yogurt, and other dairy products as well so be sure to stay tuned!

Raw Milk

Before our switch to real food I honestly had no idea what “raw milk” even was. I actually remember the day I first discovered that there’s an entire world out there of raw milk advocates complete with websites, blogs, non-profit organizations, and the like. I’ve learned that the people who drink raw milk really LOVE their raw milk and feel strongly about their choice.

Raw milk is literally the way the milk comes out of the cow. It has not been pasteurized (heated to kill pathogens) or homogenized (processed to suspend fat globules) in any way, shape, or form. In the most basic terms it’s exactly what the calves get. And I actually think this quote from Wikipedia sums up why raw milk can be such a heated topic these days: Continue Reading »

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FREE Parenting Webinar: Get Kids to Listen Without Nagging, Reminding or Yelling

We had such a good turnout when we offered free parenting webinars to our readers earlier this year that we’ve decided to do it again! I know this blog is about food, but it’s no secret that most of us are parents and sometimes we just need all the help we can get (me included!). Especially with summer upon us who wouldn’t want all that extra time with our precious offspring to be nothing but enjoyable? So please join us for a FREE 1-hour webinar led by parenting expert Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions and TODAY Show contributor, if you’d like to learn about getting your “kids to listen without nagging, reminding or yelling.” Tempting, isn’t it? :)

Free Parenting Webinar

Get Kids to Listen Without Nagging, Reminding or Yelling
led by Amy McCready

Join us to learn easy to implement strategies to correct misbehavior and reclaim the calm voice you had before kids.  Discover proven tools for your most frustrating discipline dilemmas including the 5 R’s of Fair & Effective Consequences. Tactics can be used for toddlers to teens. Continue Reading »

Posts may contain affiliate links. If you purchase a product through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but 100 Days of Real Food will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated and helps us spread our message!

Why are kids so picky?

Can someone please explain at what point in history it was decided that children’s menus would only offer the following?

  • Hamburger/Cheeseburger with French Fries (or Chips)
  • Hot Dog/Corn Dog with French Fries (or Chips)
  • Chicken Fingers with French Fries (or Chips)
  • Macaroni and Cheese
  • Cheese Pizza
  • Plain Pasta

Sure my kids would gladly devour any of these choices, but I often wonder when it was decided that kids need a special, separate meal in the first place? Since when can’t they just eat what the adults are eating? Has it always been this way? Surely not.

It amazes me when we go to birthday parties and the food served to kids consists of pizza and cake. How is that possibly being passed off as a “complete meal” for our next generation? Where are the fruit and vegetables? When was it decided that kids would only eat a handful of simple (and somewhat bland) foods? I understand that pizza is usually a crowd pleaser, but how and when did things get to be so limited?

How did children end up with such a limited palate?

I too used to be guilty of thinking kids had a very limited palate. Not long after embarking upon our “100 Days of Real Food” pledge it dawned on me that I had never before offered my daughters a salad because…they are kids after all! Continue Reading »

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Preserving Seasonal Foods: Berries

Frozen strawberries ready to go into a big zip lock bag

Every year readers ask how they can eat fresh, local produce in the dead of winter when their farmers’ markets are closed until May or June. Well, this new blog series entitled “Preserving Seasonal Foods” is your answer. I’ve found that many aspects of eating real food require one to plan ahead, and this is no exception. If you want local blueberries in your granola cereal in December then it’s up to you to freeze enough in the summer to last until the next berry season. This is definitely an area of “real food eating” where I recommend to start small…just pick a handful of items to work on preserving this summer and then try a few new ones each year. And if you really get into it you could even continue into the winter months by preserving leafy greens and other cold weather produce as well.

We started small last year ourselves and blueberries were the first items we tackled. Freezing the berries was actually so easy that I was surprised I’d put it off as long as I did. And the best part was how good our frozen, local blueberries tasted in the middle of December! I honestly couldn’t believe how good they were. Our stash of local, frozen berries was FAR superior to the frozen, organic, packaged blueberries from the store, and likely cheaper as well. The only non-frozen organic blueberries we can get here in the winter are from Chile, which of course come at an expense on both our environment (due to the distance they’ve traveled) and our wallet. So I am going to share some of the things I’ve learned so far, as well as advice from some of my wonderfully experienced readers Continue Reading »

Posts may contain affiliate links. If you purchase a product through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but 100 Days of Real Food will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated and helps us spread our message!