“Let Food Be Thy Medicine”

Earlier this month on Facebook I asked the following question:

Have any of you (or someone you know) been able to stop taking some prescription meds after making a change to your diet? If so, I’d love to hear about it!

I was definitely expecting to hear some great success stories, but was completely taken aback by almost 800 comments sharing amazing and – in some cases – truly unbelievable transformations. I just had to recap some of the really amazing feedback here in an effort to inspire and help others. But as I’ve stated on our Terms of Use page, “This information on this blog is not intended to diagnose, prevent, treat or cure any disease. Never dismiss any advice your health physician gives. The authors shall in no event be held liable for any loss or other damages bla bla bla.” So now that our arses are covered please read these stories below and be inspired. And in all seriousness, it is advised that you not stop taking any of medications unless under the guidance of your doctor. If your doctor doesn’t believe that it’s possible to improve your health through a change in diet (instead of immediately resorting to pharmaceuticals) then – GET A SECOND OPINION! Just my two cents :)

let food be thy medicin - 100 Days of Real Food.jpg Continue Reading »

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Recipe: Weeknight Green Curry Shrimp (and our allergy-friendly team dinner!)

To help ring in the New Year, we invited our (mostly Charlotte-based) blog team and their spouses over for a pot luck dinner on Saturday. Oddly enough though, the fun began weeks before anyone even arrived. As we started talking food details for our get together we quickly realized, in total, our group deals with quite a list of food allergies and aversions. And if we wanted a meal that everyone could eat we would have to adhere to the following list of (combined) constraints:

  • No dairy/lactose
  • No gluten
  • No pork, beef, or lamb (only chicken or turkey)
  • No seafood other than shrimp

Now it’s not very holiday-esque, but I have learned from cooking for another friend with gluten and dairy allergies…Asian cuisine is totally the way to go. Between the coconut-milk based sauces and dishes served over rice, the options are almost endless. So since I offered to provide the main course (and the alcohol!) I ended up settling on the below Green Curry Shrimp dish served over brown rice and topped with steamed sugar snap peas.

Green Curry Shrimp Recipe from 100 Days of Real Food Continue Reading »

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Food Allergies: Dairy (including recipes)

This is a guest post by Jill Miles our Team Assistant. To learn more about Jill check out “Our Team” page or her first post about gluten allergies.
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Did you know that food intolerances affect approximately 10% of Americans, whereas food allergies are thought to affect 4% of teens and adults and 5% of children?  Cow’s milk is the most common food allergy in American children, affecting approximately 2.5%, however many will outgrow this allergy by the time they reach school age (about 80%).

FOOD INTOLERANCE OR ALLERGY?

So, what’s the difference between a food intolerance and a food allergy?  According to WebMD, a food allergy is an immune system response. It occurs when the body mistakes an ingredient in food — usually a protein — as harmful and creates a defense system (antibodies) to fight it. Food allergy symptoms develop when the antibodies are battling the “invading” food. Milk is one of the eight most common food allergies.

A food intolerance on the other hand is a digestive system response rather than an immune system response. It occurs when something in a food irritates a person’s digestive system or when a person is unable to properly digest or breakdown the food. Intolerance to lactose, which is found in milk and other dairy products, is the most common food intolerance. Continue Reading »

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Food Allergies: Gluten (including recipes)

Jill Miles, Assistant to 100 Days of Real Food

Have you noticed lately that everyone seems to be avoiding certain foods for one reason or another?  Maybe it’s a food allergy or intolerance or perhaps just a dietary preference.  Whatever the reason, avoiding certain foods can present challenges for both eating and cooking, but, as I have found, you can overcome them.

My Story

I am Jill (assistant to 100 Days of Real Food) and a little over 2 years ago, my husband started suffering from digestive problems following back surgery.  After countless visits to doctors, including specialists, numerous medical tests and a weight loss of 40 pounds, we still had no answers.  While his most severe symptoms had subsided, he was still not feeling well and was continuing to lose weight.  Frustrated, we decided he should eliminate both gluten (despite him testing negative for celiac disease) and dairy (for which he had tested positive for a slight allergy although the doctors did not recommend avoiding it).  It has been about 9 months now and his weight has stabilized and he is feeling pretty well overall.  Even better news though is that his change in diet, although forced upon him, was really a gift.  His diet of highly processed foods was finally catching up with him, even placing him at risk for elevated cholesterol (combined with a family history of high cholesterol and heart disease).  Having to eliminate so much from his diet forced him to add in more whole foods, including fruits and vegetables.  So, at the end of the day, while the initial change in diet was both difficult and frustrating at times, the long-term health benefits have been immeasurable. Continue Reading »

Posts may contain affiliate links. If you purchase a product through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but 100 Days of Real Food will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated and helps us spread our message!