Grinding your own wheat is not crazy after all (including video)

My Wheat Grinder

A little over a year ago, when we first cut out processed food, a facebook friend told me she was grinding her own wheat for homemade breads and other recipes. I’d honestly never heard of such a thing and had no clue why anyone would want to grind their own grains in the first place. I also didn’t know where one would get wheat to grind (or what it would look like). Maybe she grew it in her own backyard? Maybe she spent all day harvesting wheat stalks and then turning a crank on some old-fashioned machine to make flour? I certainly thought it sounded way too hard-core for me and like something I would NEVER do (or want to do). Well, look at what’s happened…I’m almost embarrassed to admit that I am grinding my own wheat now too!

I realize wheat grinding initially sounded crazy to me because I didn’t understand it one bit. So I decided to create a little video (below) to show you what it’s really all about. There are no wheat stalks or cranks involved and it is actually a rather simple and high-tech process. Before we dive right in to my first blog video though, I want to share the reason why I wanted a wheat grinder in the first place. You see, before our real food adventures I used to only eat white bread. If whole-wheat bread was the only option I would go out of my way to avoid it (and I promise this is no exaggeration). A friend of mine recently reminded me that once while having lunch at her house I stubbornly rolled up some lunch meat in a piece of cheese when I learned she only had whole-wheat bread available!

My first experience eating whole-wheat bread that I actually liked was the honey whole-wheat bread from Great Harvest. Not only was it made from five simple ingredients, but it also contained whole-wheat flour that was freshly ground every morning. This experience convinced me that’s what whole-wheat bread was “supposed” to taste like. Not like the pungent 2-week old “wheat” taste you get out of factory-made grocery store bread. So before I ventured into making my own bread with a bread maker (for the convenience and cost savings) I felt I had to get a wheat grinder for it to be really good! And trust me, it is good. I cannot believe how much I like this bread considering my history with whole-wheat. And aside from the taste, many say freshly ground wheat is more nutritious than store-bought whole-wheat flour as well. According to Carrie Vitt with Deliciously Organic:

“The freshly ground whole wheat grains contain an amazing lightness and sweet flavor because the germ oil in the grains are still intact and have not gone rancid due to oxidation. When whole grain flour is stored at room temperature for over 24 hours, it begins to oxidize. It’s best to store your flour in the refrigerator. The freezer can destroy the vitamin e in the flour so best not to freeze it. If I’m going to use whole wheat flour, I want it to contain all the nutrients whole wheat is so famous for.”

So without further ado, here is a little video clip to show you what wheat grinding is really all about! As you will see in the video I use the Nutrimill, and while it is quite the investment I have been very happy with the machine so far.

[Entered into Food Renegade’s Fight Back Friday]

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