Creamy Potato Soup (Dairy-Free) + Food Sensitivity Symptoms

I don’t personally deal with food sensitivities, nor does anyone in my immediate family – at least that I am aware of! – so I asked Kiran to share how cutting out certain foods can help get to the bottom of some mysterious symptoms. We’ve also got a clean allergy-friendly option for those who need it in today’s new sponsored post.


Food Sensitivities

Food sensitivities are a hot topic these days. Personally speaking, I didn’t even know I had some until a few years ago when I was at my doctor’s office complaining about my “random” unexplained symptoms. He suggested doing a blood test to see if food sensitivities could be the cause of them. Flash forward 3 years, and I’ve now had a few different tests that have led to dietary changes.

Food Sensitivities on 100 Days of Real Food
Kiran and her family

Food Sensitivity Symptoms

Food sensitivities are your body’s reaction to various foods and can present in many different ways. Fatigue and brain fog are two of the most common symptoms, but here’s a more comprehensive list:

  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • Bloating
  • Headaches
  • Diarrhea
  • Skin problems (hives, rashes, etc.)
  • Joint pain
  • Digestive issues, stomach pain

Food sensitivities are often confused with allergies, but they are actually very different. A food allergy causes an immune response that affects organs in the body. Allergic reactions can be severe to life-threatening, causing various symptoms, and usually happen right away.

A food sensitivity is usually less serious, yet can lead to some unpleasant symptoms, such as those listed above. Food sensitivities are not as quick to occur as food allergies and may take days to cause any visible reactions, often making them difficult to diagnose without adequate testing, though keeping a food journal and doing an elimination diet can be extremely helpful.

Common Food Allergy Culprits

According to the Food Allergy Research & Education Organization, the 8 most common food allergy culprits are:

  1. Milk
  2. Eggs
  3. Peanuts
  4. Tree nuts
  5. Soy
  6. Wheat
  7. Fish
  8. Shellfish

My Experience with Food Sensitivities

I’ve had lactose intolerance all of my life, so dairy hasn’t been an option for me. I can do butter and ghee, but as for ice cream, cow’s milk, yogurt, and cheese, they’re a no-go. I also have food intolerances to wheat, peanuts, and soy … I know, I know – it was sad at first, but honestly, it’s just an adjustment and a mind shift.

I’ve had everything from a few different antibodies to skin rashes; extreme fatigue to bad headaches and more before getting to the point where I am right now. Who knew that food you think is good for you could be bad for some?

If you or anyone you know is in a similar boat, I’m sure that you appreciate foods that allow you to enjoy them without worry. Which is why we’re excited to partner with Elmhurst, a non-dairy brand milk that offers “milked” nuts AND grains (perfect for those who can’t eat nuts!) on today’s post. They’ve actually got a pretty cool story behind the brand, too.

Elmhurst Milk on 100 Days of Real Food

About Elmhurst

Elmhurst is no stranger to the dairy industry. In fact, they were the #1 dairy supplier on the East Coast for decades. But in 2016, CEO Henry Schwartz, son of co-founder Max Schwartz, saw an opportunity. At the age of 82, he closed Elmhurst Dairy and embraced a new model with a plan: to create clean label products that were just as delicious and nutritious as dairy milk, but without the dairy. After just two years into this switch, their version of “milked” dairy has become a huge hit.

What we love about Elmhurst is that they don’t include any unnecessary fillers or additives, and in addition to their nut milks they’ve created grain milks (including oats and brown rice) that are perfect for those who are sensitive to nuts or those who are just looking for another plant-based option. I have tried other nut milks in the past, and I can honestly say that Elmhurst is very different. Because of their differing process, the end product results in more nuts or grains used – which means more nutrients, more protein, better taste, and no junk. Oh yeah, and a super creamy taste, too!

My personal favorite of their unsweetened offerings is Milked Almonds as well as Hazelnut Milk, and we have a recipe for you below from Lisa so you can try them! And be sure to check out the entire lineup Elmhurst has to offer of nut milks, grain milks, and unsweetened milk options. Give Elmhurst a try and enjoy 20% off of your order with code 100days!


Creamy Potato Soup (Dairy-Free)

As Kiran mentioned above, Elmhurst has unsweetened dairy-free milk options with no unwanted food additives, and I used some in a new potato soup recipe that you can enjoy either dairy-free or with dairy, depending on your needs (either way, it’s great comfort food). Here you go!

Creamy potato soup

potato soup

Creamy Potato Soup (Dairy-Free)

In this post, learn about food sensitivity symptoms and how to deal with them, and get our allergy-friendly (dairy-free) Creamy Potato Soup recipe.
4.3 from 3 votes
Prep Time: 10 mins
Cook Time: 40 mins
Total Time: 50 mins
Print Recipe
Servings: 6 people

Ingredients
  

  • 4 slices bacon diced
  • Half onion diced
  • 1 carrot peeled and diced
  • 1 celery rib diced
  • 2 garlic cloves minced
  • 3 large potatoes about 2 ¼ lbs Russet or similar, scrubbed and cut into 1/2-inch dice with or without skin
  • 5 cups veggie broth or chicken, homemade or high-quality store-bought
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup Elmhurst Unsweetened Almond Milk can substitute regular milk or cream

Recommended Toppings

Instructions
 

  • In a large soup pot over medium heat cook the diced bacon while stirring until brown and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes.
  • Add the onion, carrot, and celery to the pot and cook until the onion begins to soften, 2 to 3 minutes.
  • Add the garlic and cook for another minute being careful not to let it burn.
  • Add the diced potatoes to the pot along with the broth and salt. Bring to a boil then turn down to a low simmer and cook uncovered until the potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork, 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Remove a third of the potato chunks (it's okay if some other good stuff comes out with them) and puree remaining soup. I like to use my hand immersion blender for this job. Stir back in the chunks along with the milk or cream until heated through, garnish with green onions and/or more bacon, and serve.

Notes

We recommend organic ingredients when feasible.
Nut-free if grain milk, regular milk, or cream are used.
Nutrition Facts
Nutrition Facts
Creamy Potato Soup (Dairy-Free)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 67 Calories from Fat 54
% Daily Value*
Fat 6g9%
Saturated Fat 2g13%
Cholesterol 10mg3%
Sodium 492mg21%
Potassium 62mg2%
Carbohydrates 2g1%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 1g1%
Protein 2g4%
Vitamin A 1700IU34%
Vitamin C 0.9mg1%
Calcium 5mg1%
Iron 0.1mg1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
Child eating creamy potato soup on 100 Days of Real Food
Someone could not even tell this soup was dairy-free!

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12 thoughts on “Creamy Potato Soup (Dairy-Free) + Food Sensitivity Symptoms”

  1. 5 stars
    This was a hit with my entire sometimes picky family (aged 5-12). On this particular day, I was happy to have kids help with chopping, and that may have helped their appetite, but really this was delicious. I changed my mind at the last minute and used some milk and 1/2 and 1/2 and 1/2, but I think it would have been as delicious with the almond milk. It had a lovely consistency and taste before I added the milk. Will make this again for sure!!!!!

  2. 3 stars
    I am a little confused. The blogger writes about having a tree nut sensitivity and the recipe says it is nut-free yet you’ve advertised and included almond milk…. which is a tree nut?? The recipe looks good but I believe everything is very misleading for those that actually do have tree nut allergies or sensitivities.

    1. Kiran Dodeja Smith

      Sorry for the confusion. I did not reference me (as the author) having a tree nut sensitivity; I did say that they have grain milks for those who cannot do nuts, so they have options for many. If one cannot do tree nuts, I would suggest trying it with one of the grain milks from Elmhurst. My kids are big fans of them, too, and I think they would work wonderfully in this soup.

      Hope this helps,
      Kiran

    2. I am glad Kiran could answer your question! Would you mind updating your comment without a star rating since it sounds like you haven’t made it yet? Thanks so much.

  3. I assume you should add the potato chunks back into the pureed soup? This sounds yummy, can’t wait to try it!

  4. Is this milk found in the refrigerated section of the grocery store or is it shelf stable? Also how long does it last once opened? I bought a nutmilk bag so I could make my own almond milk, but have to plan out when I make it, as the shelf life is only 3 days.

  5. Lindsay Untherbergus

    Awesome! I have just had to cut out dairy as well, and will potentially have to cut out wheat soon. I have been hesitating to buy almond and other dairy-free milks because they are filled with so many unrecognizable ingredients! I’ll take a look at this brand if I can find it! Also, I love the new website design :)

    1. Lindsay – You are right; I was so pleased to be introduced to this brand with more almonds used in the milk and no added sugar or junk! And thanks for the feedback on the website. We are trying to make info easier to find and have more improvements to come :) – Jason

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